Value Afghan Opium Yield Rose 133 Percent from 2010

On January 14, 2012 by stratagem

Image:UNODC

October 2010, a UNODC survey “Afghanistan opium production set to rise 61 per cent” reported  the cultivation of the poppy crop reached 131,000 hectares in 2011 and the price of opium crop rose 43 %compared to 2010 and total farm-gate income is set to increase by 133 % to reach $1.4 billion in 2011. Economically, all mineral rights and oil rights should be be signed over to the U.S. to finance the war in Afghanistan. However, the oil deals are skirted to China Afghanistan cabinet OKs oil deal with China’s CNPC. Why ? Number one answer, profitability. Oil exploration and extraction is expensive and very time consuming. The cultivating, production and smuggling of opium / heroin is  extremely profitable. NATO takes control of the previously established opium production and trade. China controls natural resources still in the ground.  A barrel of opium is worth $19,923,200 ( Oil? We’re Here for the Heroin! (at $19,923,200 per barrel!) as compared to $98.88 for a barrel of oil. It is simple math.

-Douglas

Source: Cryptogon

Production of opium and the illicit crop’s value soared in Afghanistan last year, the United Nations said in a report released Thursday.

According to the UN’s Office on Drugs and Crime, farmer income derived from Afghanistan’s opium crop in 2011 was $1.4 billion (1.09 billion euros), representing nine percent of GDP.

“Opium is therefore a significant part of the Afghan economy and provides considerable funding to the insurgency and fuels corruption,” Yury Fedotov, executive director of the UN office, said in a statement.

Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world’s opium. The UN said poppy-crop cultivation covered more than 131,000 hectares in 2011, up seven per cent from the previous year.

The overall opium crop increased by 61 per cent, from 3,600 metric tons in 2010 to 5,800 metric tons in 2011.

The value of the opium yield rose 133 percent from 2010, when plant diseases killed much of the Afghan crop.

 

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